Profile Airstryke ninja bars…

Apparently I am one of the very few cyclists who enjoy these bars for distance touring, and thats fine by me.  I can think of no greater addition to my touring.  Perhaps it is slow descent into the aging process which allows me the luxury of wanting as many positions of my hands and ergo my arms and back as possible.

I have found a few things with these.  For starters, the road can tend to be monotonous and even arduous at times.  With these bars, as I approach the apex af a hill, I can look forward to a few moments at the very least of feeling unbridled speed, tucked down, the wind whistling past my ears, I forget that I am carrying, in additio to my own weight, another 60-70 kilos, or, 120-150 pounds!

Further, when I come to a serious hill, the bars allow me to be super focused on the ground immediately beneath my wheels.  I simply look through the profile bars, go into granny gear, and pedal.  By keeping this focus, i have found that I can usually make it to the top of the hill, assuming I do not get lazy, BUT, when I look ahead to the top of the hill, which is almost a reflex action when using other hand grips, I rarely make it as my mind becomes week, and, where the mind goes, the body doth follow.

One of the best things about this particular bar is its set up, in that it leaves the rest of the handlebar free, many have adjustable elbow pads, and end up taking valuable real state on the bar!

I havent found much if any downside to the bar.  Do be VERY ATTENTIVE to having it securely tightened.  I thought I had it tightened and I put my weight on it coming down a mega hill and almost flipped over!  Not the bars fault, MINE, be attentive.  The little rubber stopper in the front of the bar fell out long ago, allowing for water to potentially seep in and cause damage, easy fix with duct tabe, dont know what tabe is, but if you use duct taPe, electricians tape, bubble gum, tightly wound chinchilla fur etc….

Lastly, you are holding on to a smaller pivot point, so any movement to the right or left will cause a greater swing than if you were holding the actual bars, be aware of this and avoid using when big rigs [18 wheelers, tractor trailers etc.] come by, you may be suprised by the wind gust and try to compensate and all of a sudden you are flying in to the brush on the side of the road, of course, that is much better than flying into the truck!

What a great piece of equipment!!!

Apparently I am one of the very few cyclists who enjoy these bars for distance touring, and thats fine by me.  I can think of no greater addition to my touring.  Perhaps it is slow descent into the aging process which allows me the luxury of wanting as many positions of my hands and ergo my arms and back as possible.

I have found a few things with these.  For starters, the road can tend to be monotonous and even arduous at times.  With these bars, as I approach the apex af a hill, I can look forward to a few moments at the very least of feeling unbridled speed, tucked down, the wind whistling past my ears, I forget that I am carrying, in additio to my own weight, another 60-70 kilos, or, 120-150 pounds!

Further, when I come to a serious hill, the bars allow me to be super focused on the ground immediately beneath my wheels.  I simply look through the profile bars, go into granny gear, and pedal.  By keeping this focus, i have found that I can usually make it to the top of the hill, assuming I do not get lazy, BUT, when I look ahead to the top of the hill, which is almost a reflex action when using other hand grips, I rarely make it as my mind becomes week, and, where the mind goes, the body doth follow.

One of the best things about this particular bar is its set up, in that it leaves the rest of the handlebar free, many have adjustable elbow pads, and end up taking valuable real state on the bar!

I havent found much if any downside to the bar.  Do be VERY ATTENTIVE to having it securely tightened.  I thought I had it tightened and I put my weight on it coming down a mega hill and almost flipped over!  Not the bars fault, MINE, be attentive.  The little rubber stopper in the front of the bar fell out long ago, allowing for water to potentially seep in and cause damage, easy fix with duct tabe, dont know what tabe is, but if you use duct taPe, electricians tape, bubble gum, tightly wound chinchilla fur etc….

Lastly, you are holding on to a smaller pivot point, so any movement to the right or left will cause a greater swing than if you were holding the actual bars, be aware of this and avoid using when big rigs [18 wheelers, tractor trailers etc.] come by, you may be suprised by the wind gust and try to compensate and all of a sudden you are flying in to the brush on the side of the road, of course, that is much better than flying into the truck!

What a great piece of equipment!!!

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